Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s


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This is true not just in the United States, but throughout the world.

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Comic art is much higher on the cultural hierarchy in such countriesas France, Italy and Belgium than in the United States Sabin, ,pp. By the early s, the largest comics industry in theworld was found not in the United States, but in Japan Sabin, , p. Local production of comic books in Hong Kong, Korea, andTaiwan, often in the shadow of the Japanese manga comic books,thrived by the mids Lent, In Mexico, comic books havehistorically been among the best-selling periodicals, appealing to bothadults and children Rubenstein, , p.

How these comics fit inwith the socio-political context of these countries, given the differentroles that the comics may play in these countries, is a question of. Introducing Comics and Ideology 5ideological import, as is the potential of the role of the comics in thecreation or resistance of cultural identity and imperialism, given theeconomic and cultural dominance of such countries as the UnitedStates and Japan. The ideology of the comics has of course been dealt with incomics scholarship well before this book. This previous research hasemphasized the fact that the portrayals of life found in comic art arenot neutral or random images.

In fact, some of themost significant studies of comic books and popular culture—keyresearch texts—have focused on the ideology of comic books. Thesestudies have not just influenced comic book scholarship, but also havebeen profoundly visible in media studies and critical theory. Intended as a polemic against what Werthamsaw were abuses by the U. The most sensational images and descriptions of comics in thebook were of the explicit sex and violence found in crime and horrorcomics of the time. Wertham at times seems progressive and even Marxist in tonewhen he explores the sexist, racist, and fascist values he believed to befound in many comic books.

His chapter on advertising in comicsraises concerns similar to later critical scholarship about advertisingdealing with body image and commodity fetishism althoughWertham does not use that term. The critical sociologist C. In Britain and Australia, activists in the CommunistParty used the controversy sparked by SOTI to raise issues aboutAmerican cultural imperialism and the dangers of mass culture Barker, ; By attacking all comics withsuch a broad stroke, Wertham also missed more subtle textual andinterpretative cues that actually critiqued dominant institutions ratherthan celebrated the status quo, especially true in his interpretations ofsome EC Comics Nyberg, Sabin argues, in fact, that warcomics of the s, often more patriotic in tone but just as violent asother books, were generally ignored by crusaders while the moreliberal-leaning EC books were targeted , p.

In the UnitedStates, the self-regulatory Comics Code which resulted from thecontroversy fanned by Wertham constrained comics in their potentialrole as oppositional culture. It was seenas such an effective anti-capitalist work that the corporate friendlydictator Augusto Pinochet specifically targeted this book for burningwhen he forcibly came into power in Chile in Solomon, The above research mainly focused on mainstream comics: thework produced by for-profit businesses and distributed in routinizedpublication outlets and, this research argues, often producing. But anotherinteresting element in the ideology of comics is the role of alternative,even underground, comics as oppositional culture.

Grounded in the counter-cultural movements of the s,underground comix are perhaps the most significant cultural legacyof this movement, excepting music Witek, , p. The underground comix influenced current comics and the socialmessages in these comics. For example, comix illustrated to main-stream creators the potential for social criticism that the comicsmedium may have. However, another legacy of the undergrounds is more a reactionto them than their outgrowth: the rise of feminist comics Sabin, ,p.

Although many of the early feminist comic creators lived in. Building on the research legacy of such critics as AngelaMcRobbie, and noting the potential for both dominant and resistantideology in comics, specific chapters in this book focus on many ofthe ideological issues discussed above. Applying political economy tocomic books, Matthew P.

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McAllister explores in the next chapter therelationship between the production context of comic books and theconstraints on messages that these books may produce. He argues thatrecent trends toward ownership concentration and media conglom-eration undermine innovation by stressing conventional content,contribute to a financial crisis faced by the industry in the mids,and disadvantage smaller publishers and retailers who often presentalternative voices in the industry. The next three chapters discuss gender themes in comics.

Takinga historical perspective, J. Women, for example, were often portrayed asbeing biologically unfit to vote, and suffragists were portrayed asunnaturally masculine. Although the two chapters that follow continue to focus on imagesof women in comics, they bring in an international perspective byconcentrating on Asian comics. Wendy Siuyi Wong and Lisa M. Cuklanz examine the recent work of Lau Lee-lee, a prominent fem-inist comic artist in Hong Kong.

Chapters 6 and 7 highlight portrayals of nationality and inter-national conflict in comics. Chapter 6 begins with the premise thatWonder Woman, an Amazon figure attempting to live in the UnitedStates, has symbolized the immigrant in Western society since her firstappearance in the s. However, author Matthew J. Smith also notesthat the portrayal of Wonder Woman has not been static, but rather theimage of the character as an immigrant has been viewed withchanging ideological frameworks that include various models ofassimilation and accommodation.

The role of the superhero and the antihero in comics—and theirideological implications—comprise the next two chapters. Ian Gordonexamines numerous incarnations of Superman to show the ideologicaldimensions of nostalgia. His essay highlights an intersection betweennostalgia and mythology in the ongoing tale of Superman. In this essay, Gordon suggests thatnewer incarnations, demonstrating deep-seated yearnings for an ideal-ized, more innocent time, construct nostalgia ideologically.

The essayby Matthew T.


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Althouse analyzes the polysemic nature of a morebrutal character—Judge Dredd, a British comic. The author contends.

by Ralph Ellison

The studyargues that Judge Dredd is an equivocal text that appealed to bothliberals and conservatives in the British public. Morris E. Similarly,the chapter by Edward H. The primary question is: What does it mean to be queer in thecomic strips? Sewell argues that mainstream portrayals tend to presentgay characters as assimilated in straight society, whereas alternativepublications stress the unique nature of gay and lesbian communities.

Finally, in chapter 12 Julie Davis tackles one of the most popularcomic strips in the United States by exploring the degree to whichDilbert serves as oppositional culture by critiquing certain economicand social ideals of society. The greatest American hero: Ego ideals and familial exper-iences. The Journal of Psychoanalytic Anthropology, 6 4 , — Barker, M.

A haunt of fears: The strange history of the British horrorcomics campaign.

Carson Can’t Keep Up with Rodney Dangerfield’s Non-Stop One-Liners (1974)

London: Pluto Press. Comics: Ideology, power and the critics.


  1. Understanding the European Union: A Concise Introduction;
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  5. Manchester,England: Manchester University Press. Getting a conviction: Or, how the British horror comics cam-paign only just succeeded. Lent Ed.


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    Comics of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean

    The comic-stripped American. Baltimore: Penguin Books. Bongco, M. Reading comics: Language, culture, and the concept of thesuperhero in comic books. New York: Garland Publishing. Brown, J. Comic book fandom and cultural capital. Journal of PopularCulture, 30 4 , 13— Carrier, D. The aesthetics of comics. Dorfman, A. How to read Donald Duck: Impe-rialist ideology in the Disney comic. New York: I. De Haven, T. Borrowing Richard Outcault. Inks, 2 3 , 18— Edwards, J. Representative form and the visualideograph: The Iwo Jima image in editorial cartoons.

    Rius (1934–)

    Quarterly Journal of Speech,83 3 , — Gilbert, J. New York: Oxford University Press. Gower, D. Health-related content in daily newspaper comic strips: Acontent analysis with implications for health education. Education, 1 , 37— Gordon, I. Comic strips and consumer culture, —, Washington:Smithsonian Institution Press.

    Harvey, R.

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    ​Was Marijuana Really Less Potent in the 1960s?

    Nowadays, Chicanismo is mostly about ethnic pride, cultural expression and the defense of immigrants. Today's Chicanos are trying to protect immigrants and Dreamers, the term used to describe immigrants who were brought to the U. They're just as likely to fight for access to higher education as for better K schools, and they're battling against gentrification in traditionally Mexican-American communities such as Los Angeles's Boyle Heights.

    And they're much more likely to defend the rights of women and LGBTQ Latinos, almost unheard in the s use of Chicano, not unlike much of the general population.

    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s
    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s
    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s
    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s
    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s
    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s
    Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s Not Just for Children: The Mexican Comic Book in the Late 1960s and 1970s

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